Monday, February 24, 2014

Millennials and the Age of High Expectations

The demographic that’s driving a lot of the change that we’re experiencing in the Age of Now is Millennials. They are more confident, independent, mobile and tech savvy. Millennials know what they want, and because of the power of the Internet, they don’t have to wait to realize their potential. As an employer, they are one of the more challenging groups to manage, but when they’re thriving at peak performance, there’s nothing like it.

The latest Millennial Survey from Deloitte sheds a bit more light on their thinking and helps us “other” age groups understand what’s driving their dreams, aspirations and expectations.

Millennials want to work for businesses that encourage and foster creative thinking. They want less structure, less procedure and more flexibility. They are looking to management that backs them and opens doors to showcase their skills.

They believe that it is up to business to make the world a better place (a view that I support whole heartedly, and have so for years). It is corporations who should be tackling issues like climate change, resource scarcity and income equality. Government is a big let-down in the eyes of Millennials. Bureaucracy is too expensive, not agile and inefficient.

Millennials, quite rightly in my view, want to be proud of who they work for. They want to feel like they’re making a difference. Ultimately, if a business isn’t meeting their needs and aspirations, Millennials have no qualms about moving on. Gone are the days where people work to cash in their pensions after long-service. Employee loyalty no longer works on such simplistic formulas. The challenge for employers is to be more creative about talent retention. A job isn’t enough. It’s about the whole of life picture. With 75% of the global workforce going to be made up of Millennials in a decade, it’s a challenge business needs to take up now.

1 comment:

Media Messiah said...

Totally agree with this one. More than ever it's a meritocracy. If I spot an opportunity to do something amazing for someone, I go ahead and offer. If they say "Who are you?", "Why are you contacting me?", "What are you after?", I just move on until I find someone who says "Go ahead: amaze me!" And then I do. However good you are, if someone says they can help you be even better, let 'em put their money where their mouth is and prove it.