Friday, May 25, 2007

A Cool Idea

I have always believed that the way to achieve great things is often best done one person at a time. Trouble is, we are all human and we struggle to see how any single action can make a big enough difference to matter. That mind-set is why I was impressed by the Japanese Government’s on-going campaign to encourage business people to take up the Okinawan shirt. This famous garment is very like the Hawaiian shirt. The idea? To get businessmen out of their hot suits and ties and into cooler open neck shirts so that the amount of air conditioning can be reduced. The Government is serious about this initiative. Thermostats in government buildings will be set at 28 degrees Celsius from June 1. Now that’s smart. Help individuals combat global warming – and feel more comfortable doing it.

6 comments:

AndreSC said...

Awesome, much remains to be said for the worth of healthy autocracy :-)

Tyler said...

I think SA will need to think about something similar soon if Eskom carries on the way it has been over the past few months.

Kwame said...

Nice to know this idea is finally being taken up--It's been around a long time. For example a group researchers at the Center for Energy and Environmental Policy, University of Delaware, suggested something like this in a 1996 paper titled "Air conditioning in the tropics: cool comfort or cultural conditioning?" :)

Rouvanne said...

President Nelson Mandela made his trademark Madiba shirts popular when meeting all manner of people...

I just wondered, could it be that much of the madness on this continent was caused by wearing a tie in the African heat? I seldom see President Mugabe without a suit!

JPB said...

This is the start for the social revolution in Japan!!Ties and suits are paradigms for dicipline, and hierarchy,elements that have ruled the conservatory society in Japan for the last many centuries..

Susan956 said...

I think it's also very cool to unpack notions that certain clothing equates certain ways of being or status etc. I'm often amazed (in our contemporary society) how some businesses cling to old notions of displaying 'what-it-is-to-be' successful.